Being an Oscar voter *doesn’t* mean never having to say you’re sorry

Los Angeles Time
February 22, 2009

Best actress nominee Kate Winslet (“The Reader”) has lost all five of her previous Oscar nominations, as you’ve probably heard by now more times than you can count, thanks to an army of people seeking to curry favor for her candidacy — or, perhaps more aptly, sympathy for her — this time around.
Winslet, who is widely considered the greatest actress of her generation, has indeed had her share of Oscar misfortune:

    1995  Nominated for best supporting actress for “Sense and Sensibility,” she lost to Mira Sorvino for “Mighty Aphrodite”
    1997  Nominated for best actress for “Titanic,” she lost to Helen Hunt for “As Good as It Gets”
    2001  Nominated for best supporting actress for “Iris,” she lost to Jennifer Connelly for “A Beautiful Mind”
    2004  Nominated for best actress for “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” she lost to Hilary Swank for “Million Dollar Baby”
    2006  Nominated for best actress for “Little Children,” she lost to Helen Mirren for “The Queen”

But does pulling out stats like this and playing the shame game actually work with academy members? In short, yes. There have been numerous instances of actors winning Oscars for performances that were — like Winslet’s in “The Reader” — fine but not nearly their finest, primarily to make amends for past slights.
Here are some of the most prominent examples:

    Bette Davis was voted best actress for “Dangerous” (1935) in part to make up for her Oscar loss the previous year for “Of Human Bondage” (1934)
    James Stewart was voted best actor for “The Philadelphia Story” (1940) in part to make up for his Oscar loss the previous year for “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939)
    Joan Fontaine was voted best actress for “Suspicion” (1941) in part to make up for her Oscar loss the previous year for “Rebecca” (1940)
    Joan Crawford was voted best actress for “Mildred Pierce” (1945) in part to make up for her having never previously been nominated
    John Wayne was voted best actor for “True Grit” (1969) in part to make up for his previous Oscar loss for “Sands of Iwo Jima” (1949) and in part to make up for his never having been nominated for other great performances
    Paul Newman was voted best actor for “The Color of Money” (1986) in part to make up for Oscar losses in past years for “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” (1958), “The Hustler” (1961), “Hud” (1963), “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Rachel, Rachel” (1968), “Absence of Malice” (1981) and “The Verdict” (1982)
    Al Pacino was voted best actor for “The Scent of a Woman” (1992) in part to make up for his Oscar losses in past years for “The Godfather” (1972), “Serpico” (1973), “The Godfather, Part II” (1974), “Dog Day Afternoon” (1975), “… And Justice for All” (1979) and “Dicky Tracy” (1990)
    Henry Fonda was voted best actor for “On Golden Pond” (1981) in part to make up for his previous Oscar loss for “The Grapes of Wrath” (1940) and also for having not been nominated for other great performances
    Shirley MacLaine was voted best actress for “Terms of Endearment” (1983) in part to make up for her Oscar losses in past years for “Some Came Running” (1958), “The Apartment” (1960), “Irma La Douce” (1963), and “The Turning Point” (1977)
    Russell Crowe was voted best actor for “Gladiator” (2000) in part to make up for his Oscar loss the previous year for “The Insider” (1999) and in part to make up for having not been nominated for “L.A. Confidential” (1997)
    Nicole Kidman was voted best actress for “The Hours” (2002) in part to make up for her Oscar loss the previous year for “Moulin Rouge!” (2001)
    Peter Jackson was voted best director for “The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King” (2003) in part to make up for his previous Oscar loss for “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” (2001) and also for having not been nominated for “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” (2002)
    Martin Scorsese was voted best director for “The Departed” (2006) in part to make up for his Oscar losses in past years for “Raging Bull” (1980), “The Last Temptation of Christ” (1988), “Goodfellas” (1990), “Gangs of New York” (2002) and “The Aviator” (2004)

  
Never miss a post!
Subscribe to Benny Labamba:

Email:  
- OR -

Home | Bio | Conditions of Use | Privacy Policy | Copyright Information | Advertise | Contact | RSS
© Copyright 2014 BennyLabamba.com